Muscle Car of the Week: Mustang Boss 302

Blue muscle car Mustang Boss 302We’ve all known a guy who had one of these. It’s a favorite among the customers at our muscle car restoration services shop. We knew a very passionate owner of one in the mid-seventies. He knew this car was special even way back then. He babied it most of the time and would occasionally prove that it could indeed do 0-60 in 6.9s. He did this when we least expected it. Let us tell you, the Boss 302 could peel the skin off your face.

After a couple of years, our friend sold the Mustang Boss 302 and got himself a Corvette Stingray. Not long after that he traded the beautiful Stingray in for kid-friendly transportation (you see the progression here). While he never mentions the Stingray, he does keep a photo of the Boss 302 tacked up in garage. We’re looking for a muscle car restoration project for him to work on. He is dragging his feet a bit. I think he is holding out for The Boss. And why not?

The Mustang Boss 302 Car Interior

The Boss 302 isn’t a pick-your-favorite-year muscle car. It was a limited-run monster. An instant myth. In 2007, a fully restored 1969 fetched north of 500k at auction. Somewhere our friend is weeping.

Designed by Larry Shinoda, the car was given the name “Boss” because anytime someone asked Shinoda what he was working on he replied, “The boss’ car.” A nod to his inside joke. The Boss 302 engine was anything but a joke. A small block V-8 with large Cleveland heads the 302 clattered at perfect idle, almost as if it was annoyed to be sitting still. The listed horsepower was 290. Nonsense. Ford listed that for race purposes. We would love get a Boss 302 into the Brauns garage for a true dyno-run.

Car and Driver said, “The Boss 302 is a hell of an enthusiast’s car. It’s what the Shelby GT 350s and 500s should have been but weren’t.” Our take? The Boss 302 is a legend.

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1967 Ford Mustang Shelby GT500 Fastback

hot rod restorationArguably the most legendary hot rod of all time, the 1967 Ford Mustang Shelby GT500 Fastback is a true American classic. It is considered the holy grail of hot rods to auto restoration car enthusiasts. This rare and mythical muscle car restoration machine lives up to its reputation with a 355hp V8 engine.

The Ultimate Hot Rod Restoration Project

If you were to run chassis dyno testing on this timeless vehicle, you would immediately see why it’s revered as the ultimate hot rod restoration project. Shelby added a custom fiberglass hood, nose, and intakes, giving this classic ride its distinctive look. The car featured numerous powerful upgrades from its stock counterpart, including improved carburetors, manifolds, transmission, and braking system.

Unrivaled Manual Transmission

The Shelby had a four speed manual transmission that powered it into the history books—race after race. Due to its immense popularity, it is exceedingly hard to find a well maintained one for sale. That is where Los Angeles auto restoration shops like Brauns really shine. Their skilled mechanics have taken countless weathered classic cars and turned them into truly show-stopping hot rods. The shop is a perfect example of hot rod restoration at its finest.
The GT500 is also the only car to have the distinction of having its own credit in a movie. It is listed as “Eleanor” in the movie Gone in 60 Seconds (the old school original made in 1974, not the remake). This movie essentially solidified the Mustang’s prominence in American pop culture with its groundbreaking chase scenes.
A recently auctioned 967 Shelby GT500 commanded a whopping $1.3 million price tag when all was said and done. Under the hood of this one-of-a-kind Shelby is a 427 cubic-inch V8 from none other than the Ford GT40 racecar. This car is the pinnacle of hot rod restoration—no detail on the vehicle was overlooked and the result was unparraleled.